Carl’s Blog part 2 – Medical training, tea and cake!

Carl’s Blog continues…

3 Feb 2016 – New Member Medical Training

Adrian Sawyer’s watchful eye

As a new member of WILSAR and a prospective trainee we have to complete five different “core” subjects before we can then be loaded onto the residential search technician course.  The first of which saw us RV at the Wiltshire police HQ on Wednesday evening to conduct some initial medical training under the watchful eye of WILSAR’s medical lead Adrian Sawyer.

On arrival I was pleasantly surprised at the number of new members that had turned up for the evening. Apparently this was the largest group of new members the WILSAR team had seen for some time and had nothing to do with the malicious rumour that there would be free tea and cake at some point.

So, before starting Adrian gave us the opportunity to introduce ourselves and what we do for a living as well as what previous medical experience we actually have, he also threw in the curve ball of adding “something interesting about yourself”.

As I sat their trying (and failing) to think of something interesting about myself it became apparent that the range of jobs and qualifications the assembled class brought to the party was vast, from boxers to race car technicians to fire arms officers to nurses everyone had something different to offer and all but a few had done some kind of medical training in the past, albeit to varying degrees.

The brief started with some of the policy and the guidelines that WILSAR operate within when it comes to medical training and the fact that all of the training they conduct is geared toward a national standard which allows SAR teams and emergency services from different regions to work together in the event of a large scale incident.

Yes, tied up!

The MIBS stretcher

It was then time to get our hands on some of the equipment and after some initial reluctance there were plenty of volunteers to be tied up (yes tied up) using the MIBS stretcher and the other equipment available before moving outside for a demonstration from an operational team bringing together all of the things that we had been shown.

The whole evening had gone very quickly and there is plenty to take in, the fact it was just after 10pm was irrelevant as the training and demonstration had been first class. Just enough time for questions and a quick wash up and we were released. After waiting round for a further 10 minutes the tea and cake still didn’t materialise so I decided to go home.

Unfortunately I won’t be attending the Bank Search Training at the weekend but I’m looking forward to the next core subject and climbing a further rung towards becoming an operational member of the team.  Just time for a quick apology for some inaccuracies (and typos) in last week’s blog where I referred to my night search team leader as “Susan”, it always takes me a while to remember everyone’s name. Sorry Sandra, I will get the drinks in on the next social!!

 

See the rest of the story so far: http://wilsar.org.uk/?s=carl+blog

 


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